— World War Two Northern Ireland —

Places

Some World War Two history in Northern Ireland has disappeared under plough or wrecking ball but many places dating back to the 1940s can still be visited.

US President Eisenhower reviews American military personnel in Donegall Square, where Belfast City Hall stands in May 1944.

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Unknown.

— American GIs —

American Cemetery, Colleville-sur-Mer

The American Cemetery at Colleville overlooks Omaha Beach and is the largest allied burial ground in Normandy. This is where 'Saving Private Ryan' begins.

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— D-Day —

Sword Beach, Ouistreham

Sword Beach was one of five landing areas chosen for the Normandy invasion on D-Day 6th June 1944. It was taken by British forces who advanced towards Caen.

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— D-Day 70 —

The Seafront, Southsea

The Southsea Seafront has a wealth of military history from Henry VIII's 16th-century castle to the impressive, unique D-Day Museum and Overlord Tapestry.

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— D-Day 70 —

Hamtun Street, Southampton

In Southampton's 'Old Town' you'll find Hamtun Street. It's only a few yards away from sights like the Tudor House and Garden or the old Merchant's Cottage.

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— D-Day 70 —

Holy Rood Church, Southampton

Holy Rood Church in Southampton is a reminder of the devastation wreaked by the Luftwaffe in 1940 but it's also a memorial with links to the city of Belfast

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— D-Day 70 —

Royal Naval Air Station, Eastleigh

Royal Naval Air Station Eastleigh, known as HMS Raven during the war, operated under the command of the Royal Navy and is known as the home of the Spitfire.

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— Aerial Warfare —

Royal Naval Aircraft Yard, Belfast

The name of the George Best City Airport in Belfast has changed many times over the years but during World War Two it was a busy Royal Naval Aircraft Yard.

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— Aerial Warfare —

RAF Sydenham, Belfast, Co. Antrim

Now George Best City Airport in Belfast but from 1939 to 1941, the dockside site was Royal Air Force Sydenham and was home to Bomber Command 88 Squadron.

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— Aerial Warfare —

Belfast Lough, Belfast

Today, the tranquil Belfast Lough is worlds away from the hive of military activity it saw coming up to D-Day and Operation Overlord during World War Two.

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